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OCO-2 News Articles

  • Warm nights could flood the atmosphere with carbon under climate change December 7, 2015
    Warm nights could flood the atmosphere with carbon under climate change
    A new study suggests that hotter nights may wield more influence than previously thought over the planet's atmosphere as global temperatures rise -- and could eventually lead to more carbon flooding the atmosphere.Warm nights could flood the atmosphere with carbon under climate change
  • As Earth Warms, NASA Targets 'Other Half' of Carbon, Climate Equation November 12, 2015
    As Earth Warms, NASA Targets 'Other Half' of Carbon, Climate Equation
    Carbon dioxide from wildfires and urban sources blankets the Northern Hemisphere. Credit: NASA/GSFC/GMAOAs Earth Warms, NASA Targets 'Other Half' of Carbon, Climate Equation
  • Seven Case Studies in Carbon and Climate November 12, 2015
    Seven Case Studies in Carbon and Climate
    Every part of the mosaic of Earth's surface -- ocean and land, Arctic and tropics, forest and grassland -- absorbs and releases carbon in a different way.Seven Case Studies in Carbon and Climate
  • Excitement Grows as NASA Carbon Sleuth Begins Year Two October 29, 2015
    Excitement Grows as NASA Carbon Sleuth Begins Year Two
    Scientists busy poring over more than a year of data from NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) mission are seeing patterns emerge as they seek answers to the science questions that drive the mission.Excitement Grows as NASA Carbon Sleuth Begins Year Two
  • As 'good' as it gets September 15, 2015
    As "good" as it gets
    The common adage “good things will come to those who wait” cannot ring truer than for NASA’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) mission and team members. A little more than a year after launch, the team is proud to make their first milestone in demonstrating the capability and precision of the OCO-2 instrument in measuring atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations.As 'good' as it gets
  • Great plains agricultural greenhouse gas emissions could be eliminated August 7, 2015
    Great plains agricultural greenhouse gas emissions could be eliminated
    Researchers from the Natural Resource Ecology Lab at Colorado State University and their partners have completed a historical analysis of greenhouse gas emissions from the U.S. Great Plains that demonstrates the potential to completely eliminate agricultural greenhouse gas emissions from the region.Great plains agricultural greenhouse gas emissions could be eliminated
  • Feds: US heat-trapping carbon dioxide pollution from power plants drops to lowest since 1988 August 5, 2015
    Feds: US heat-trapping carbon dioxide pollution from power plants drops to lowest since 1988
    WASHINGTON (AP) - The Energy Department says heat-trapping pollution from U.S. power plants hit a 27-year low in April.Feds: US heat-trapping carbon dioxide pollution from power plants drops to lowest since 1988
  • The Point of No Return: Climate Change Nightmares Are Already Here August 5, 2015
    The Point of No Return: Climate Change Nightmares Are Already Here
    The worst predicted impacts of climate change are starting to happen — and much faster than climate scientists expectedThe Point of No Return: Climate Change Nightmares Are Already Here
  • River buries permafrost carbon at sea August 5, 2015
    River buries permafrost carbon at sea
    As temperatures rise, some of the organic carbon stored in Arctic permafrost meets an unexpected fate--burial at sea.River buries permafrost carbon at sea
  • Obama unveils rules to limit carbon dioxide emissions, curb climate change August 3, 2015
    Obama unveils rules to limit carbon dioxide emissions, curb climate change
    In a sweeping bid to curb heat-trapping pollution that is altering the planet's climate, President Barack Obama on Monday unveiled the first-ever limits on carbon dioxide emissions from the nation's power plants.Obama unveils rules to limit carbon dioxide emissions, curb climate change

Watching the planet breathe
Watching the planet breathe

When plants photosynthesize, they use energy from sunlight to turn carbon dioxide from the air into sugars used to live and grow. In doing so, they give off a fluorescent light — a glow that can’t be seen with the naked eye, but that can be seen with the right instruments. More photosynthesis translates into more fluorescence, meaning that the plants are very productive in taking up carbon dioxide. The amount of carbon dioxide taken up by plants is called “gross primary productivity,” and is the largest part of the global carbon cycle.