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OCO-2 News Articles

  • United States absorbed carbon dioxide despite a drought April 25, 2016
    United States absorbed carbon dioxide despite a drought
    The warm spring of 2012 in the U.S. caused plants to absorb more carbon, thereby compensating for reductions during the subsequent summer drought, researchers have demonstrated.United States absorbed carbon dioxide despite a drought
  • rees Deal With Climate Change Better Than Expected March 16, 2016
    rees Deal With Climate Change Better Than Expected
    The bend-don’t-break adaptability of trees extends to handling climate change, according to a new study that says forests may be able to deal with hotter temperatures and contribute less carbon dioxide to the atmosphere than scientists previously thought.rees Deal With Climate Change Better Than Expected
  • Consumers care about carbon footprint February 26, 2016
    Consumers care about carbon footprint
    How much do consumers care about the carbon footprint of the products they buy? Would they care more if the goods were labeled with emissions data?Consumers care about carbon footprint
  • How Northern European waters soak up carbon dioxide February 25, 2016
    How Northern European waters soak up carbon dioxide
    The seas around the UK and the rest of northern Europe take up a staggering 24 million tonnes of carbon each year.How Northern European waters soak up carbon dioxide
  • New climate model better predicts changes to ocean-carbon sink February 24, 2016
    New climate model better predicts changes to ocean-carbon sink
    Since pre-industrial times, the world's oceans have absorbed 41 percent of the carbon dioxide humans have released into the atmosphere. The remainder stays airborne, warming the planet.New climate model better predicts changes to ocean-carbon sink
  • Antarctic ice sheet is more vulnerable to carbon dioxide than expected February 22, 2016
    Antarctic ice sheet is more vulnerable to carbon dioxide than expected
    Results from a new climate reconstruction of how Antarctica's ice sheets responded during the last period when atmospheric carbon dioxide reached levels like those expected to occur in about 30 years, plus sediment core findings reported in a companion paper, suggest that the ice sheets are more vulnerable to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide than previously thought.Antarctic ice sheet is more vulnerable to carbon dioxide than expected
  • A carbon sink that can't be filled January 7, 2016
    A carbon sink that can't be filled
    Forests can store as much as 45 percent of the world's terrestrial carbon, making them a critical part of the process of regulating climate change.A carbon sink that can't be filled
  • Melting of massive ice 'lid' resulted in huge release of carbon dioxide at the end of the ice age Date: January 4, 2016
    Melting of massive ice 'lid' resulted in huge release of carbon dioxide at the end of the ice age Date:
    A new study of how the structure of the ocean has changed since the end of the last ice age suggest that the melting of a vast 'lid' of sea ice caused the release of huge amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.Melting of massive ice 'lid' resulted in huge release of carbon dioxide at the end of the ice age Date:
  • Warm nights could flood the atmosphere with carbon under climate change December 7, 2015
    Warm nights could flood the atmosphere with carbon under climate change
    A new study suggests that hotter nights may wield more influence than previously thought over the planet's atmosphere as global temperatures rise -- and could eventually lead to more carbon flooding the atmosphere.Warm nights could flood the atmosphere with carbon under climate change
  • As Earth Warms, NASA Targets 'Other Half' of Carbon, Climate Equation November 12, 2015
    As Earth Warms, NASA Targets 'Other Half' of Carbon, Climate Equation
    Carbon dioxide from wildfires and urban sources blankets the Northern Hemisphere. Credit: NASA/GSFC/GMAOAs Earth Warms, NASA Targets 'Other Half' of Carbon, Climate Equation

Watching the planet breathe
Watching the planet breathe

When plants photosynthesize, they use energy from sunlight to turn carbon dioxide from the air into sugars used to live and grow. In doing so, they give off a fluorescent light — a glow that can’t be seen with the naked eye, but that can be seen with the right instruments. More photosynthesis translates into more fluorescence, meaning that the plants are very productive in taking up carbon dioxide. The amount of carbon dioxide taken up by plants is called “gross primary productivity,” and is the largest part of the global carbon cycle.